A Few Secrets – Unbelievable Bone Broth Benefits for Digestion, Arthritis and Cellulite

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“Good broth will resurrect the dead,” says a South American proverb. Said Escoffier: “Indeed, stock is everything in cooking. Without it, nothing can be done.”  Science validates what our grandmothers knew. Rich homemade chicken broths help cure colds!

Bone broth or stock was a way our ancestors made use of every part of an animal. Inedible bones and marrow, knuckles, skin and feet, tough meat, tendons and ligaments were boiled then simmered over a period of days. This simmering causes the bones and ligaments to release healing compounds like collagen, proline, glycine, and glutamine that have the power to transform your health.

Broths contain minerals in forms that your body can easily absorb: calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, silicon, sulphur and others.  Broths contain chondroitin and glucosamine, pricey supplements sold to repair joints and reduce inflammation. You can toss those and just start eating bone broth. Broths contain everything you need to repair your joints. Broth and soup made with fish heads and carcasses provide iodine and thyroid-strengthening substances.

 

I recommend everyone make bone broth and incorporate it into your dietary routine. Here’s why:

 

Dr. Kellyann Petrucci | Why Collagen-Rich Bone Broth is Liquid Gold

 

 

1.  Treat leaky gut syndrome – Heal and seal your gut. 

According to Jill Grunewald, a holistic nutrition coach and founder of Healthful Elements, a cup a day works miracles for leaky gut syndrome but it’s also good for protecting non-leaky guts. The gelatin in the bone broth (found in the knuckles, feet, and other joints) helps protects and heal the mucosal lining of the digestive tract. The amino acid l-glutamine in bone broth is the main amino acid the gut uses to repair the intestinal lining.This helps cure chronic diarrhea, constipation, and even some food intolerances.

 

2.  Overcome food intolerances and allergies – 

By healing a leaky gut you can resolve issues related to food intolerance and allergies because they are caused mainly by undigested large food particles seeping out of a leaky gut and triggering an immune response.   Broth heals the gut lining, preventing this issue.

 

3.  Improve joint health – 

The glucosamine in bone broth stimulates the growth of new collagen, repairs damaged joints and reduces pain and inflammation.

Bone broth is one of world’s best sources of natural collagen, the protein found in vertebrae animals — in their bones, skin, cartilage, ligaments, tendons and bone marrow. The glucosamine in bone broth stimulates the growth of new collagen, repairs damaged joints and reduces pain and inflammation.

As we get older, our joints naturally experience wear and tear, and we become less flexible.As we age, cartilage diminishes as it gets attacked by antibodies (age-related degradation of joint cartilage). As bone broth simmers, collagen from the animal parts leaches into the broth and becomes readily absorbable to help restore cartilage.

One of the most valuable components of bone broth is gelatin, which acts like a soft cushion between bones that helps them “glide” without friction. Gelatin also provides us with building blocks that are needed to form and maintain strong bones, helping take pressure off of aging joints and supporting heathy bone mineral density.

World class researches have found gelatin and collagen to have the following benefits:

  • Gelatin helps people with food allergies and sensitivities tolerate those foods including cows milk and gluten.
  • Collagen protects and soothes the lining of the digestive tract and can aid in healing IBS, Crohn’s, ulcerative colitis and acid reflux.
  • Gelatin promotes probiotic balance and growth.
  • Bone broth increases collagen reducing the appearance of wrinkles and banishing cellulite.
  • Gelatin helps break down proteins and soothes the gut lining, proving useful for leaky gut syndrome and the autoimmune disorders that accompany it.
  • Gelatin provides bone-building minerals in easily absorbable ways, preventing bone loss and reducing join pain.

 

4.  Reduce cellulite & maintain healthy skin- 

Consuming collagen-rich bone broth can reduce cellulite and tighten your skin making you look younger.

Collagen helps form elastin and other compounds within skin that are responsible for maintaining skin’s youthful tone, texture and appearance. Collagen integrity is accredited with helping reduce the visible signs of wrinkles, decreasing puffiness and fighting various other signs of aging. Many people report a decrease in cellulite when consuming foods and supplements containing collagen, since cellulite forms due to a lack of connective tissue, allowing skin to lose its firm tone.

Cellulite does not arise from carrying excess fat.

  • Cellulite comes from a lack of connective tissue.
  • The smoothness of skin is from an abundance of connective tissue.
  • Collagen-rich bone broth will supply your skin with the tools that it needs to support itself.
  • Adding chicken feet, animal joints, and knuckles to a bone broth will increase the amount of collagen available.

The collagen and gelatin in bone broth n results in healthy hair growth and keeps your nails strong as well.

 

5.  Boost immune system – 

One of the most remarkable things about bone broth is its gut-supportive benefits, which as described above actually have a holistic effect on the body and support healthy immune system function.

Leaky gut occurs when undigested particles from foods seep through tiny openings in the weakened intestinal lining and enter the bloodstream, where the immune system detects them and becomes hyperactive. This increases inflammation and leads to dysfunctions all over, as the immune system releases high levels of antibodies that cause an autoimmune-like response and attack healthy tissue.

Bone broth is one of the most beneficial foods to consume to restore gut health and therefore support immune system function and healthy inflammation response. Collagen/gelatin and the amino acids proline, glutamine and arginine help seal these openings in the gut lining and support gut integrity. Traditionally made bone broths are believed to support healthy inflammatory response and normal immune system function.  Bone broth can even promote healthy sleep, boost energy during the day and support a healthy mood.

 

Healing Amino Acids

Gelatin in bone broths contain amino acids like arginine, glycine, glutamine and proline.   There are numerous benefits of these amino acids:

Arginine

  • Immune system function and wound healing
  • Production of growth hormone
  • Regenerates damaged liver cells
  • Production of sperm

Glycine

  • Prevents breakdown of protein tissue like muscle
  • Aids sleep
  • Used to make bile salts and glutathione
  • Helps detoxify the body of chemicals (4)
  • Improves memory and performance

Proline

  • Repairs leaky gut
  • Regenerates cartilage and heal joints
  • Reduces cellulite and makes skin more supple

Glutamine

  • Heals the gut lining
  • Improves metabolism and muscle building
  • Fuel for cells in small intestine

 

The recipe that follows calls for beef bones, but you can also make bone broth using whole organic chicken, whole fish (including the head) or fish bones, or pork. Each will render a different flavor. Boynton and Brackett actually suggest starting with chicken because it has the mildest flavor (beef tends to be more overpowering). If you’re using chicken, simply place the entire chicken, raw, into the pot in place of the beef bones and proceed with the recipe as follows.

One note, if cooking a whole chicken, the meat should start separating from the bone after about 2 hours. Simply remove the chicken from the pot and separate the meat from the bones. Then place the bones back in and continue to simmer. You can even use bones from a roasted chicken or turkey carcass to make bone broth, which is incredibly cost effective since you would otherwise throw them away.

The longer you cook this nourishing broth, the more savory and concentrated it will become. Roasting the bones and vegetables beforehand will add even more flavor and richness. Season with salt and sip this restorative broth on its own, use it as a cooking liquid for grains or legumes, or deploy it as a base for sauces and soups like hearty, healthy Detox Pho.

 

Dr. Kellyann’s how to make bone broth:

 

Bone Broth Recipe  – (Dr. Mercola)

Calories: 379 per serving Serving Size: 3 Quarts

Ingredients


• 3-4 pounds beef marrow and knuckle bones
• 2 pounds meaty bones such as short ribs
• 1/2 cup raw apple cider vinegar
• 4 quarts filtered water
• 3 celery stalks, halved
• 3 carrots, halved
• 3 onions, quartered
• Handful of fresh parsley
• Sea salt

Procedure


1 Place bones in a pot or a crockpot, add apple cider vinegar and water, and let the mixture sit for 1 hour so the vinegar can leach the mineral out of the bones.

2 Add more water if needed to cover the bones.

3 Add the vegetables bring to a boil and skim the scum from the top and discard.

4 Reduce to a low simmer, cover, and cook for 24-72 hours (if you’re not comfortable leaving the pot to simmer overnight, turn off the heat and let it sit overnight, then turn it back on and let simmer all day the next day)

5 During the last 10 minutes of cooking, throw in a handful of fresh parsley for added flavor and minerals.

6 Let the broth cool and strain it, making sure all marrow is knocked out of the marrow bones and into the broth.

7 Add sea salt to taste and drink the broth as is or store in fridge up to 5 to 7 days or freezer up to 6 months for use in soups or stews.

 

What to Remember Most About This Article:

Bone broth is rich in minerals to strengthen the immune system and support healthy digestion. Bone broth also contains collagen to strengthen tendons, joints, ligaments, bone, and skin.

The collagen in bone broth will help heal the lining of the gut to relieve heartburn, GERD, and other types of intestinal inflammation. On top of that, collagen will support healthy skin to make it supple and strong to reduce the appearance of cellulite.

You can make bone broth at home and even use it in your next fast to give your body ample nourishment. The glycine in bone broth will detoxify the body of harmful chemicals, improve sleep, and boost memory and performance.

 

More Recipes shared by:   Sally Fallon Morell

CHICKEN STOCK

1 whole free-range chicken or 2 to 3 pounds of bony chicken parts, such as necks, backs, breastbones and wings*
gizzards from one chicken (optional)
2-4 chicken feet (optional)
4 quarts cold filtered water
2 tablespoons vinegar
1 large onion, coarsely chopped
2 carrots, peeled and coarsely chopped
3 celery stalks, coarsely chopped
1 bunch parsley

*Note: Farm-raised, free-range chickens give the best results. Many battery-raised chickens will not produce stock that gels.

If you are using a whole chicken, cut off the wings and remove the neck, fat glands and the gizzards from the cavity. Cut chicken parts into several pieces. (If you are using a whole chicken, remove the neck and wings and cut them into several pieces.) Place chicken or chicken pieces in a large stainless steel pot with water, vinegar and all vegetables except parsley. Let stand 30 minutes to 1 hour. Bring to a boil, and remove scum that rises to the top. Reduce heat, cover and simmer for 6 to 8 hours. The longer you cook the stock, the richer and more flavorful it will be. About 10 minutes before finishing the stock, add parsley. This will impart additional mineral ions to the broth.

Remove whole chicken or pieces with a slotted spoon. If you are using a whole chicken, let cool and remove chicken meat from the carcass. Reserve for other uses, such as chicken salads, enchiladas, sandwiches or curries. Strain the stock into a large bowl and reserve in your refrigerator until the fat rises to the top and congeals. Skim off this fat and reserve the stock in covered containers in your refrigerator or freezer.

 

BEEF STOCK

about 4 pounds beef marrow and knuckle bones
1 calves foot, cut into pieces (optional)
3 pounds meaty rib or neck bones
4 or more quarts cold filtered water
1/2 cup vinegar
3 onions, coarsely chopped
3 carrots, coarsely chopped
3 celery stalks, coarsely chopped
several sprigs of fresh thyme, tied together
1 teaspoon dried green peppercorns, crushed
l bunch parsley

Place the knuckle and marrow bones and optional calves foot in a very large pot with vinegar and cover with water. Let stand for one hour. Meanwhile, place the meaty bones in a roasting pan and brown at 350 degrees in the oven. When well browned, add to the pot along with the vegetables. Pour the fat out of the roasting pan, add cold water to the pan, set over a high flame and bring to a boil, stirring with a wooden spoon to loosen up coagulated juices. Add this liquid to the pot. Add additional water, if necessary, to cover the bones; but the liquid should come no higher than within one inch of the rim of the pot, as the volume expands slightly during cooking. Bring to a boil. A large amount of scum will come to the top, and it is important to remove this with a spoon. After you have skimmed, reduce heat and add the thyme and crushed peppercorns.

Simmer stock for at least 12 and as long as 72 hours. Just before finishing, add the parsley and simmer another 10 minutes. You will now have a pot of rather repulsive-looking brown liquid containing globs of gelatinous and fatty material. It doesn’t even smell particularly good. But don’t despair. After straining you will have a delicious and nourishing clear broth that forms the basis for many other recipes in this book.

Remove bones with tongs or a slotted spoon. Strain the stock into a large bowl. Let cool in the refrigerator and remove the congealed fat that rises to the top. Transfer to smaller containers and to the freezer for long-term storage.

 

FISH STOCK

3 or 4 whole carcasses, including heads, of non-oily fish such as sole, turbot, rockfish or snapper
2 tablespoons butter
2 onions, coarsely chopped
1 carrot, coarsely chopped
several sprigs fresh thyme
several sprigs parsley
1 bay leaf
1/2 cup dry white wine or vermouth
1/4 cup vinegar
about 3 quarts cold filtered water

Ideally, fish stock is made from the bones of sole or turbot. In Europe, you can buy these fish on the bone. The fish monger skins and filets the fish for you, giving you the filets for your evening meal and the bones for making the stock and final sauce. Unfortunately, in America sole arrives at the fish market preboned. But snapper, rock fish and other non-oily fish work equally well; and a good fish merchant will save the carcasses for you if you ask him. As he normally throws these carcasses away, he shouldn’t charge you for them. Be sure to take the heads as well as the body—these are especially rich in iodine and fat-soluble vitamins. Classic cooking texts advise against using oily fish such as salmon for making broth, probably because highly unsaturated fish oils become rancid during the long cooking process.

Melt butter in a large stainless steel pot. Add the vegetables and cook very gently, about 1/2 hour, until they are soft. Add wine and bring to a boil. Add the fish carcasses and cover with cold, filtered water. Add vinegar. Bring to a boil and skim off the scum and impurities as they rise to the top. Tie herbs together and add to the pot. Reduce heat, cover and simmer for at least 4 hours or as long as 24 hours. Remove carcasses with tongs or a slotted spoon and strain the liquid into pint-sized storage containers for refrigerator or freezer. Chill well in the refrigerator and remove any congealed fat before transferring to the freezer for long-term storage.

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